We’re forever praying about health. We intercede for our suffering friends, asking God to heal them and alleviate their pain. But in a world where we’re all moving toward decay and physical difficulty, should that be our main concern?

In this edition of PCA Voices, Covenant College professor Kelly Kapic encourages us to think about suffering more holistically. In the midst of suffering, he suggests that perhaps we, like Martin Luther, should pray, “Lord help me not to blaspheme.” In other words, praying, “Help me to remember you’re not cruel. When we suffer, strengthen our faith.”

To come to that place, Kapic encourages us to focus on the idea of “embodiment” and to ponder the fact that our bodies are good. Sometimes, he believes, we downplay the fact of incarnation — that God became man and took on a real body. Let’s think through what that means, even when we suffer.

One Response to Grasping the Reality of Embodiment

  1. Phillip Shroyer says:

    Sometimes cruelty is associated with just. They repel one another..
    A just God leads towards particular salvation.